The Many Faces of Tallinn

I was in Tallinn for the day, as many of you may already know, photographing the city for Day With A Local. I have been in Tallinn many times but this time was different. Firstly, I was alone and could explore at my leisure, secondly, I was able to see the city in a completely different way.

It started with Linnahall, an area I have always wanted to visit but never got around to, even though I have passed by it many times when leaving and returning to the port. Then as I walked through the neighbourhood of Kalamaja, pretty much by accident, I started to see a city of colour. Each building and door different from the last.

Once seeing these details there was no stopping my eyes from seeing more. As I begun walking the streets of the medieval Old Town I started to see faces hidden in the buildings themselves. Maybe it was just me, after looking for so long you can start to trick yourself, so I want to hear what you think.

Here are my best buildings with faces from Tallinn. If you enjoy them I would like to hear from you in the comments below, tell me what your favourite is or share with me a building you have photographed that has its own expression.

The Many Faces of Tallinn

The strange expression of St Nicholas Church.

The Many Faces of Tallinn

Timed this one perfectly when a passer-by appeared down the alleyway, or should I say open mouth.

The Many Faces of Tallinn

This one could be a little bit of a reach but those half circular windows in the roof definitely resemble eyes.

The Many Faces of Tallinn

Looking out of the old town. Many tourists and visitors to Tallinn’s old town come through this way. Doesn’t this entrance look surprised?

Tell me your favourite below.

Further reading:

More from Tallinn HERE, my favourite would be my visit to Linnahall.

I am a team member of Day With A Local and these photographs were taken in cooperation with them.

Another great city I recently visited was Copenhagen.

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Doors of Tallinn

Photographing doors had never occurred to me until a year ago but now I find myself doing it more and more often. After walking through the Kalamaja neighbourhood and looking for more details of the city I begun to look out for unique doors as I walked through the old town.

Doors of Tallinn

My favourite from the doors I photographed in Kalamaja.

Doors of Tallinn

Passing through the medieval streets of Tallinn’s old town.

Doors of Tallinn Doors of Tallinn

A side door to the grand Alexander Nevsky Cathedral. It wouldn’t be fair to include the main entrance to the cathedral here.

Doors of Tallinn

A modest entrance to a cellar bar and restaurant nestled in the walls of the old town.

Doors of Tallinn

The juxtaposition between door and building. The underwhelming colourless walls with its bright blue door.

Doors of Tallinn

Not exactly a door but I am going to include it, at least it adds a but of variety and demonstrates the surprises you find on ever corner of Tallinn.

As there is little road traffic in the old town and therefore not many cars parked up on the sides of the roads there were far more opportunities for photographs.

See a fellow bloggers perspective on the same door at Destination Anywhere, minus the scaffolding.

The grand (above) and the old (below). Which do you prefer?

This trip opened my eyes to the peculiar beauty of Tallinn and it was a welcomed surprise. I look forward to returning and seeing more. I was only able to visit a few of the neighbourhoods in the center of town, next time I want to travel further afield.

Any tips on any particularly special areas in Tallinn that you think I should visit? I would like to hear them in the comments.

Further reading:

Read my previous post Doors of Kalamaja

I am a team member of Day With A Local and these photographs were taken in cooperation with them.

More doors HERE.

Doors of Kalamaja

After leaving Linnahall I headed in the general direction of Telliskivi, a creative neighbourhood I had visited before. I wouldn’t say that I know Tallinn well but felt that I could wind my way through the streets until I had a better idea of where I was but hoping to stumble upon where I needed to be.

After a few roads of relatively new buildings I came across a quint neighbourhood full of older, colourful wooden houses, each with its own character. I especially notice the striking and unique doors that I begun to photograph as I walked through. Some were obscured by cars but there were still plenty of others to choose from.

I soon realised that I had stumbled across a very interesting part of Tallinn I never expected to see, especially when I found the small Kalju Church, unfortunately it’s door was locked.

The Doors ranged hugely, from the beautiful to the rugged, the well preserved to the beaten up, and the colourful to the plain. Still, it didn’t matter even the plainest of doors had their own character, you just had to look a little harder to see it.

Kalamaja is a neighbourhood of growing popularity in the city of Tallinn. Bordered by the medieval stonewalls of the old town on one side and Tallinn’s coastline on the other, it is a diverse and interesting neighbourhood with Telliskivi at its heart.

I began to think that I had seen them all but further up the road I would be even more surprised by the next, especially when they became more striking and colorful.

What’s your favorite door from Tallinn? Let me know in the comments below and I would like to see your favourite doors, share a link to your post or Instagram.

Further Reading:

How about my post Colourful Copenhagen, another surprisingly colourful city, even on a foggy winter’s day.

I am a team member of Day With A Local and these photographs were taken in cooperation with them.

More doors HERE.

Linnahall In Black and White

Slowly decaying on a small section of Tallinn’s coast is Linnahall, an old sports and concert venue built in 1980. The venue was built as part of the Olympics that took place in Moscow in the same year.  At this time Estonia was apart of the Soviet Union and as Moscow didn’t have a suitable location to hold the sailing events Tallinn was chosen.

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

There was little sign of life and I was the only walking around. At the entrance there were a few cars parked outside but I had no idea where the owners would have gone. If the offices inside were used I thought to myself, what a miserable place to work.

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

When the venue was completed it was named V. I. Lenin Palace of Culture and Sport but was later changed to Linnahall, most likely when Estonia became independent in 1991.

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

Who knows when Poseidon saw its last customers. Not much of a night out now.

Linnahall In Black and White

You can walk fairly freely around the building as long as you can navigate the maze of stairs, many of which still lead to a dead end or locked gate.
Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

What surprised me most about Linnahall was that the building was completed in 1980, and from the looks of things, it was abandoned almost right away. I know, 1980 was actually sometime ago and more likely the venue has been used more recently.

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

It seems like such a waste to leave a large and interesting building to go unused but it happens everywhere, especially when it comes to buildings built for the Olympics. My visit to Linnahall has sparked my interested and I am keen to learn more about the building and what the city has planned for its future.

Linnahall In Black and White Linnahall In Black and White

As with any building left to sink into disrepair, Linnahall has attracted a fair amount of attention from graffiti artists, some of it better than others..

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

Views of St Olaf’s Church and Tallinn’s medieval old town can be seen as it’s only a short distance away.

Linnahall In Black and White

From the outside it is difficult to tell what Linnahall is all about. The crumbling and graffitied walls, the locked doors and barred windows, are hiding the secrets of what lies within. Unfortunately, that will have to wait for another time.

Linnahall In Black and White

Further reading:

I am a team member of Day With A Local and these photographs were taken in cooperation with them.

If you are a fan of Landscapes try my post Lapland in Black and White or take a look at my other posts in black and white, there are plenty.

Colourful Copenhagen

When visiting Copenhagen I was expecting a city similar to Helsinki or even Stockholm, and in some ways it was, but one thing I wasn’t expecting was to find these splashes of colour on almost every street corner. Even on a gloomy winter’s day I was surprised how colourful Copenhagen was.

Colourful Copenhagen

These weren’t the only urban bird houses I saw, there were rows of them doted around the city. I am not sure if they are purely for decoration or home to some nesting birds, either way they should be encouraged.

Colourful Copenhagen

Colourful Copenhagen

I stumbled across a few great pieces of street art, especially around Christiania. There were areas of Copenhagen where the line between art and graffiti had been crossed but in most cases it gave the city personality.

Do you see it as art or as graffiti?

Colourful Copenhagen

Christiania was a pretty colourful neighborhood even during the winter. Most visitors snap a photo of the entrance before putting their camera away for the rest of their visit. I covered Christiania in more detail in another post and you can read that HERE.
Colourful Copenhagen

One of the most colourful and most famous rows of houses in Copenhagen has to be those in Nyhavn, a popular spot for tourists and a few love locks.

Colourful Copenhagen

Each Neighborhood had its own design, some with rows and rows of identical houses. The houses around Grundtvig’s Church is another example, you can see my photographs from the church and its surroundings HERE.

Colourful Copenhagen Colourful Copenhagen

There was plenty of construction taking place in the city but your attention isn’t always focused on that, as the fences were often painted in lines of colour or surrounded by an obscure piece of colourful art.

Colourful Copenhagen

The area around Superkilen was very unique in many ways, there were plenty of photo opportunities including this rainbow coloured bike rack.

Colourful Copenhagen

Even at night there were colourful spots to be found. See another view of the National Opera House HERE.

What did you think? If you have colourful shots from Copenhagen I would like to see them, share your links in the comments below. I am also on Instagram and would like to see any photos there that you love.

Christiania – The Troubles of a Freetown

When heading to Copenhagen I had little interest in visiting Christiania but I had heard from friends that it would be worth it, after all it is Copenhagen’s second most visited place in the city.

Christiania began Forty-five years ago when the military moved out of what had been a long standing military base and squatters moved in. The community grew and grew with the government finally legalising the squat in 1983. In 2011 Christiania’s future was threaten so the residents set up a foundation to buy the land from the government, many people were happy to donate and 12.5 million kroner was raised.

Christiania - The Troubles of a Freetown

Photos are prohibited within Chritstiania and I was happy to follow the request. After a few snaps at the entrance my camera went into my bag and in we went.

Because of the drug trade the area had lost some of its charm in my opinion, it could have also been the time of year. Visiting in the summer I am sure the atmosphere would be different, there were plenty of areas for people to gather in the sun and the natural surroundings would be picturesque. But on this gloomy winter’s day it wasn’t the most welcoming,  especially when we stumbled across the ominously named ‘Pusher Street’.

I hadn’t read much about the area before my arrival and I had no idea about the change that Pusher Street had recently gone through. Huts that had once lined the roads had recently been torn down in an effort to reduce the drug trade that had been dominating Christiania. It is estimated that 1 billion kroner changes hands on Pusher Street with many people looking to grab a piece, leading to other problems. The most recent being a shooting in August 2016 where a policeman was shot and two others injured.

Christiania - The Troubles of a Freetown

Flag of Christiania

Now, the huts had been replaced with groups of guys standing around, some huddled around burning trash cans. I never felt unsafe or threaten as I walked through but it was far from a comfortable situation. The residents have never wanted Christiania to be only about the use of cannabis and since these incidences they have decided to move away from it, encouraging people to buy elsewhere.

Once through the group of buildings we walked along the embankments that ran next to the water. Christiania was at one time an operational military base for hundreds of years and has a number of sites under national heritage protection.

Christiania - The Troubles of a Freetown

Christiania within the city of Copenhagen

Houses continued all the way back to the waterside, some were old buildings that had been re-purposed, others were more make-shift, made from recycled materials crudely knocked together. It would have been nice to walk along the water, and even to the other side, but my trip was restricted by time, so we walked back to the road in search of Danish pastries.

Even now I still don’t know exactly why the people of Christiania are allowed to in habit such a large area of Copenhagen, and with the growing need for development how much longer it will exist, but I think it is great in this modern world that there is a place where people can build their own society and community with values of their own.  And that is something to see and experience.

Christiania - The Troubles of a Freetown

Further Reading: 

Paradise lost: does Copenhagen’s Christiania commune still have a future? was helpful read when learning about the community and the problems it had faced.

Read more about the Darker Side of Tourism which Christiania would be a contender.