System Failure

The last few months have been a whirlwind, devouring all my time and this blog has suffered as a result of that. This is something I want to remedy starting now.

Last year I packed up my life and moved countries, back home to the UK. Before getting completely settled I took a month holiday and went to Australia for a friends wedding, visiting Amsterdam and Beijing along the way.

System Failure

But the one thing I can blame for my silence is the destruction of my computer (largely from my own doing). It has played havoc with my workload and productivity, which is partly my fault as I am still procrastinating over which one to replace it with.

Though, I will not let these problems stand in my way any longer. I have been working on a few ideas in my head and it won’t be long before I put them together for you to see. Because of my recent travels and the change in my living situation I am sitting on a bunch of great content that I need you to see. I hope that I can find the words (and the time) to bring these to life.

I would greatly appreciate that you stick around and see what I have been up to in my absence, as well as what I am will be doing in the future. 2018 has started well and I aim for that to continue.

In the meantime visit my other accounts where I try to post more frequently:

facebook.com/allabouttheimagehelsinki

Instagram.com/tom8enjamin

twitter.com/tom8enjamin

Doors of Kalamaja

After leaving Linnahall I headed in the general direction of Telliskivi, a creative neighbourhood I had visited before. I wouldn’t say that I know Tallinn well but felt that I could wind my way through the streets until I had a better idea of where I was but hoping to stumble upon where I needed to be.

After a few roads of relatively new buildings I came across a quint neighbourhood full of older, colourful wooden houses, each with its own character. I especially notice the striking and unique doors that I begun to photograph as I walked through. Some were obscured by cars but there were still plenty of others to choose from.

I soon realised that I had stumbled across a very interesting part of Tallinn I never expected to see, especially when I found the small Kalju Church, unfortunately it’s door was locked.

The Doors ranged hugely, from the beautiful to the rugged, the well preserved to the beaten up, and the colourful to the plain. Still, it didn’t matter even the plainest of doors had their own character, you just had to look a little harder to see it.

Kalamaja is a neighbourhood of growing popularity in the city of Tallinn. Bordered by the medieval stonewalls of the old town on one side and Tallinn’s coastline on the other, it is a diverse and interesting neighbourhood with Telliskivi at its heart.

I began to think that I had seen them all but further up the road I would be even more surprised by the next, especially when they became more striking and colorful.

What’s your favorite door from Tallinn? Let me know in the comments below and I would like to see your favourite doors, share a link to your post or Instagram.

Further Reading:

How about my post Colourful Copenhagen, another surprisingly colourful city, even on a foggy winter’s day.

I am a team member of Day With A Local and these photographs were taken in cooperation with them.

More doors HERE.

Linnahall In Black and White

Slowly decaying on a small section of Tallinn’s coast is Linnahall, an old sports and concert venue built in 1980. The venue was built as part of the Olympics that took place in Moscow in the same year.  At this time Estonia was apart of the Soviet Union and as Moscow didn’t have a suitable location to hold the sailing events Tallinn was chosen.

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

There was little sign of life and I was the only walking around. At the entrance there were a few cars parked outside but I had no idea where the owners would have gone. If the offices inside were used I thought to myself, what a miserable place to work.

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

When the venue was completed it was named V. I. Lenin Palace of Culture and Sport but was later changed to Linnahall, most likely when Estonia became independent in 1991.

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

Who knows when Poseidon saw its last customers. Not much of a night out now.

Linnahall In Black and White

You can walk fairly freely around the building as long as you can navigate the maze of stairs, many of which still lead to a dead end or locked gate.
Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

What surprised me most about Linnahall was that the building was completed in 1980, and from the looks of things, it was abandoned almost right away. I know, 1980 was actually sometime ago and more likely the venue has been used more recently.

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

It seems like such a waste to leave a large and interesting building to go unused but it happens everywhere, especially when it comes to buildings built for the Olympics. My visit to Linnahall has sparked my interested and I am keen to learn more about the building and what the city has planned for its future.

Linnahall In Black and White Linnahall In Black and White

As with any building left to sink into disrepair, Linnahall has attracted a fair amount of attention from graffiti artists, some of it better than others..

Linnahall In Black and White

Linnahall In Black and White

Views of St Olaf’s Church and Tallinn’s medieval old town can be seen as it’s only a short distance away.

Linnahall In Black and White

From the outside it is difficult to tell what Linnahall is all about. The crumbling and graffitied walls, the locked doors and barred windows, are hiding the secrets of what lies within. Unfortunately, that will have to wait for another time.

Linnahall In Black and White

Further reading:

I am a team member of Day With A Local and these photographs were taken in cooperation with them.

If you are a fan of Landscapes try my post Lapland in Black and White or take a look at my other posts in black and white, there are plenty.

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is an agency of the United Nations with its purpose to contribute to peace and security by promoting science, culture and education.. UNESCO overseas many different projects but the one I want to concentrate on is their involvement in World Heritage Sites.

UNESCO assists in protecting World Heritage Sites, these are sites of outstanding cultural or natural importance. There are just over 1000 listed sites across 195 member states with Italy ranking the highest with 51 sites. These sites fall under the categories cultural, natural and mixed.

Recently the organisation has been criticised as recent events in Syria led to the destruction of ancient sites and there was little they could do to stop it. Its not only these factors that effect World Heritage Sites. Though the site is protected the area surrounding it is often over developed to accommodate the amount of tourists that UNESCO World Heritage Site label brings.

Does the UNESCO label effect your travel decisions? Is visiting a World Heritage Site important to you?

UNESCO Gallery