The Human Body

I don’t spend nearly enough time in London, it’s a great city with so much to offer. When I do make it there I often get wrapped up in the usual sights to see anything new from the city, but I normally come across one or two new details which impress me.

More often than not these details are the ones that you come across by mistake, you find them when you least expect to, they surprise you, and this is exactly what happened during my recent visit.

But before I tell that story I have to go back a few years to the beginning.

Around five years ago I was flying out to Helsinki from London and had heard about a Damien Hirst exhibition taking place at the Tate Modern, I decided to head down a day early, stay with a friend, and catch my flight after checking out the exhibition.

The Human Body

Damien Hirst at the Tate

Outside the Tate Modern I was greeted by a large sculpture of a human body. The sculpture closely resembled the plastic figures that are used in biology classes,  the ones you can take apart to understand the body’s anatomy, only much larger.

It was my first time at the Tate and my first time seeing Hirst’s work, both equally impressive. I had arrived early and the museum hadn’t yet opened for the day so I spent a bit of time photographing the sculpture and the view over the Millenium Bridge to St Paul’s.

The sculpture itself looked over one of my most favourite views of the city.

The Human Body

Sculpture in the City

This brings me to my more recent visit.

On the way to Leadenhall Market, one of London’s oldest market, to meet a friend I came across another sculpture. At first I thought the sculpture was the same as the one I had seen in London all those years go. It wasn’t until I came home and delved into my archives that I realised they were different.

My searched deepened, I found out the name of the piece, Temple also by Damien Hirst, and that it was part of a public art exhibition called Sculpture in the City.

I guess the point of this story is to say that two unconnected points in time can be linked in a way you may have never expected, chance encounters that take you back in time to past moments. If nothing else it was a good excuse to go through some old photos.

Further Reading:

More from Sculpture in the City 2017 by TimeOut and about the artworks.

Also my last post about the Black Shed Expanded

Explore the Helsinki Metro and the sculptures you can see along the journey, as well as the Sculptures of Helsinki in general.

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Glowing in the Night

Glowing in the Night

There are two things about this photo that I like, the shadow of Mannerhiem’s statue on the outside of the museum, the other is the glowing red light of Mona Hatoum’s exhibit Hot Spot on the top floor of the Museum. Just a shame about the construction in the foreground.

What do you like? Or even dislike?

Mannerhiem

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Sculptures of Helsinki #18

Mannerhiem, or by his full name Baron Carl Gustav Emil Mannerheim (1867-1951), is known to be one of the most influential figures of the 20th century in Finland. He started his military career in the Russian Army, during the years when Finland was an autonomous part of Russia. Finland declared its independence in 1917 but shortly after a civil war broke out between the reds and the whites, Mannerhiem was appointed military chief of the whites.

During World War II Mannerhiem was appointed the commander in chief of the Finnish armed forces and led them to victory against the Soviet Union. Once World War II was concluded Mannerhiem was elected president and served for two years. He died shortly after in 1951.

His statue of him riding a horse on Mannerhiemtie was unveiled in 1960 after public donations were raised. Including the pedestal the statue is 11.7 meters tall and can be seen easily from the first floor of the Kiasma museum it stands out the front of. This isn’t the only memorial to Mannerhiem in the city, there is also the house where he lived which has been preserved and turned into a museum, as well as his grave in Hietaniemi Cemetery.

Looking for a new angle to photograph the statue I went inside Kiasma Museum. Photographing the statue from inside would allow me to include the work of Mona Hatoum’s which is currently in the museum. Her work often features maps and globes, below is a great example of a world map made from hundreds of marbles slightly modified to fit the space. Another of my favorites is a globe with the continents outline in red lights called Hot Spot.

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You can find almost 500 outdoor sculptures, pieces of environmental art and historical monuments in Helsinki and they are accessible to everyone. See more and search through the database at HAMhelsinki.fi.

Seurasaari

Seurasaari

Seurasaari is a small island close to the Helsinki city center and serves as an open air museum. You are only allowed to enter the island by foot and once there you can enjoy the natural surroundings. Throughout the island there are different buildings which have been brought from all over Finland to show how local life was in those areas.

Not only are there older buildings but there are also more modern ones like this wilderness church hidden away on the south coast of the island.

Seurasaari

Photo Challenge: Local

Sculptures of Helsinki #4

 

Sculptures of Helsinki

National Museum, Helsinki

The sculptor of ‘The Bear‘ Emil Wikström is known for creating national symbols and icons out of Finland’s native animals and plants, this statue was a cooperation with three other artists. The bear was unveiled on the steps of the National Museum in 1918, currently the tower of the museum is under construction.

You can find almost 500 outdoor sculptures, pieces of environmental art and historical monuments in Helsinki and they are accessible to everyone. See more and search through the database at HAMhelsinki.fi

Statue challenge from Destination: Everywhere