The Human Body

I don’t spend nearly enough time in London, it’s a great city with so much to offer. When I do make it there I often get wrapped up in the usual sights to see anything new from the city, but I normally come across one or two new details which impress me.

More often than not these details are the ones that you come across by mistake, you find them when you least expect to, they surprise you, and this is exactly what happened during my recent visit.

But before I tell that story I have to go back a few years to the beginning.

Around five years ago I was flying out to Helsinki from London and had heard about a Damien Hirst exhibition taking place at the Tate Modern, I decided to head down a day early, stay with a friend, and catch my flight after checking out the exhibition.

The Human Body

Damien Hirst at the Tate

Outside the Tate Modern I was greeted by a large sculpture of a human body. The sculpture closely resembled the plastic figures that are used in biology classes,  the ones you can take apart to understand the body’s anatomy, only much larger.

It was my first time at the Tate and my first time seeing Hirst’s work, both equally impressive. I had arrived early and the museum hadn’t yet opened for the day so I spent a bit of time photographing the sculpture and the view over the Millenium Bridge to St Paul’s.

The sculpture itself looked over one of my most favourite views of the city.

The Human Body

Sculpture in the City

This brings me to my more recent visit.

On the way to Leadenhall Market, one of London’s oldest market, to meet a friend I came across another sculpture. At first I thought the sculpture was the same as the one I had seen in London all those years go. It wasn’t until I came home and delved into my archives that I realised they were different.

My searched deepened, I found out the name of the piece, Temple also by Damien Hirst, and that it was part of a public art exhibition called Sculpture in the City.

I guess the point of this story is to say that two unconnected points in time can be linked in a way you may have never expected, chance encounters that take you back in time to past moments. If nothing else it was a good excuse to go through some old photos.

Further Reading:

More from Sculpture in the City 2017 by TimeOut and about the artworks.

Also my last post about the Black Shed Expanded

Explore the Helsinki Metro and the sculptures you can see along the journey, as well as the Sculptures of Helsinki in general.

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Sculpture in the City

Black Shed Expanded

Black Shed Expanded by Nathaniel Rackowe stands below the building more commonly known as the Gherkin. The shed, painted in black bitumen, looks as if it is being blown apart by the yellow light that comes from within.

Rackowe said about his work, ‘I thought it interesting to take the humble shed and elevate it so it can rise up and challenge architecture, deconstructing it to the point where you are forced to re-read it.’

Black Shed Expanded is part of a larger public exhibition know as Sculpture in the City comprising of 18 other pieces dotted around the financial district of London.

Further Reading:

Sculpture in the City: About the artworks

Public art in the Helsinki Metro

Sculptures of Helsinki

Jussi TwoSeven the street artist that displays his work in public places

By Night

Night photography takes a little more technique and time than just point and shoot. You have to know the functions of your camera well but the end results can always be different and sometime surprising. For me I think that is part of the appeal.

The inspiration for this post comes from a post card a friend of mine would always send me. The card would be completely blank with the simple phrase ‘(Insert name of city he was visiting at the time) By Night’.  The scene never changed, just the name of the city it was supposed to be representing.

 

Tate modern

Tate Modern

The Bankside Power Station in London is now home to the Tate Modern. At first there had been a coal fired power station in this location from 1891 but the area was developed and construction of the current building was fully completed in 1963. Between 1952-1981  the power station generated electricity for the city.

The building sits on the bank of the Thames and is seen as a historical icon of the city. Its unique chimney was restricted at a height of 99m as it had be lower St. Paul’s Cathedral on the opposite bank. In recent years the building went through a £134 million conversion project and opened in 2000 as the Tate Modern

These photographs were taken at a time when the Tate Modern was hosting a Damien Hirst exhibit and the statue outside was part of his work, other famous work of Hirst is the 50 million diamond encrusted platinum skull and the shark in a tank, both were featured in the exhibit.

DSCF1024

The Royal Family

Buckingham Palace, London

Buckingham Palace, London

The Royal Family costs ever taxpayer in the UK £1.33 per year. Some people argue that the cost of the Royal Family is largely compensated by the tourism that they bring to the country. This number can’t actually be estimated but the Royal Family does at least play a large part in creating our national identity.

Buckingham Palace is a part of my post The Lost Landmarks.

The Lost Landmarks

Here they are. My suggestions of landmarks that I think are a must see and that weren’t present on the 60 Landmarks to See Before You Die article. I haven’t been to every country so my short list is compiled from places that I have personally been and photographed.

Now I can recommend them to you.

If you have a landmark that you feel should be included please feel free to share and together we can create a personalised collection of recommended landmarks to visit.

The Lost Landmarks

Thanks to The Blue Spade for the suggestion that inspired this post.

Further Reading:

Landmarks in London

This week I am talking about landmarks after being inspired by a list of landmarks to see before you die. Yesterday, I posted images from my visits to London. Even though I am from the UK whenever I visit London I always feel like a tourist, usually because I am showing around a friend. The tour normally takes a walk along the Thames from the Houses of Parliament and ends at St Paul’s Cathedral, taking in the great view of the domed Cathedral from across the river.

Like any city you visit that you aren’t familiar with, London surprises me every time, there is always something new to see. One of the greatest things that I haven’t seen in other cities I’ve visited is museums are free to visit, with just a recommended donation. For me this allows everyone the right to education and to see something they might not normally have the chance to.

Landmarks in London

The Natural History Museum

Take a look at more of my photographs from the theme Landmark.