The Human Body

I don’t spend nearly enough time in London, it’s a great city with so much to offer. When I do make it there I often get wrapped up in the usual sights to see anything new from the city, but I normally come across one or two new details which impress me.

More often than not these details are the ones that you come across by mistake, you find them when you least expect to, they surprise you, and this is exactly what happened during my recent visit.

But before I tell that story I have to go back a few years to the beginning.

Around five years ago I was flying out to Helsinki from London and had heard about a Damien Hirst exhibition taking place at the Tate Modern, I decided to head down a day early, stay with a friend, and catch my flight after checking out the exhibition.

The Human Body

Damien Hirst at the Tate

Outside the Tate Modern I was greeted by a large sculpture of a human body. The sculpture closely resembled the plastic figures that are used in biology classes,  the ones you can take apart to understand the body’s anatomy, only much larger.

It was my first time at the Tate and my first time seeing Hirst’s work, both equally impressive. I had arrived early and the museum hadn’t yet opened for the day so I spent a bit of time photographing the sculpture and the view over the Millenium Bridge to St Paul’s.

The sculpture itself looked over one of my most favourite views of the city.

The Human Body

Sculpture in the City

This brings me to my more recent visit.

On the way to Leadenhall Market, one of London’s oldest market, to meet a friend I came across another sculpture. At first I thought the sculpture was the same as the one I had seen in London all those years go. It wasn’t until I came home and delved into my archives that I realised they were different.

My searched deepened, I found out the name of the piece, Temple also by Damien Hirst, and that it was part of a public art exhibition called Sculpture in the City.

I guess the point of this story is to say that two unconnected points in time can be linked in a way you may have never expected, chance encounters that take you back in time to past moments. If nothing else it was a good excuse to go through some old photos.

Further Reading:

More from Sculpture in the City 2017 by TimeOut and about the artworks.

Also my last post about the Black Shed Expanded

Explore the Helsinki Metro and the sculptures you can see along the journey, as well as the Sculptures of Helsinki in general.

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Sculpture in the City

Black Shed Expanded

Black Shed Expanded by Nathaniel Rackowe stands below the building more commonly known as the Gherkin. The shed, painted in black bitumen, looks as if it is being blown apart by the yellow light that comes from within.

Rackowe said about his work, ‘I thought it interesting to take the humble shed and elevate it so it can rise up and challenge architecture, deconstructing it to the point where you are forced to re-read it.’

Black Shed Expanded is part of a larger public exhibition know as Sculpture in the City comprising of 18 other pieces dotted around the financial district of London.

Further Reading:

Sculpture in the City: About the artworks

Public art in the Helsinki Metro

Sculptures of Helsinki

Jussi TwoSeven the street artist that displays his work in public places

Art in the Metro

Art in the Metro

Kamppi, Helsinki

Sculpture of Helsinki #21

ROAR27 is the latest work by Jussi TwoSeven and can be found on the platform of Kamppi Metro Station. The exhibit space is operated by HAM Helsinki and features different artist depending on the current theme of the museum. Having art in public spaces is an excellent way to expand people’s horizons, allowing them to see something that they wouldn’t necessarily see.

Art in the Metro

Kamppi, Helsinki

Want to see more? Take a look at my other photos from Helsinki Metro.

Photo Challenge: Heritage

You can find almost 500 outdoor sculptures, pieces of environmental art and historical monuments in Helsinki and they are accessible to everyone. See more and search through the database at HAMhelsinki.fi.

Between the Blocks

Between the Blocks

Sculpture of Helsinki #19

From top to bottom is a memorial to Finland’s second president, Lauri Kristian Relander (1883-1942), and is situated in the Töölö neighborhood. The sculptor was Matti Peltokangas and he was the winning entry in competition for a memorial. The four blocks are much bigger than they look, each side is just over 2 meters with the grooves cut in opposite directions on each side.

You can find almost 500 outdoor sculptures, pieces of environmental art and historical monuments in Helsinki and they are accessible to everyone. See more and search through the database at HAMhelsinki.fi.

Sibelius Monument

Jean Sibelius was born in 1865 and was a composer of classical music, his music is often credited with giving Finland a national identity as they struggled for independence from Russia. Sibelius’s image was on the 100 mark note before Finland adopted the euro and his national day is celebrated on his birthday, December 8th.

The Sibelius Monument was inaugurated in 1967 and since then has become one of the most popular tourist destinations in Helsinki. The monument is 8.5 meters high and 10.5 meters wide with 600 metal pipes making up its vast size. The monument also contains a likeness of Sibelius seen on the right.

During the summer the monument is crowded with tourists posing next to the metal pipes and even putting their heads inside. Another popular photograph is to take one pointed up to the sky through the pipes. On this autumn day the area was empty except for a lone woman sitting on a bench just out of frame to the left.

Sculpture of Helsinki #16

Autumn in Helsinki

You can find almost 500 outdoor sculptures, pieces of environmental art and historical monuments in Helsinki and they are accessible to everyone. See more and search through the database at HAMhelsinki.fi.

Fountain in the Night

Sculptures of Helsinki

Sculptures of Helsinki #14

The story behind this sculpture isn’t an interesting one but I am really happy with the long exposure and the way motion of the water is captured. The Bank of Finland Fountain is made from welded pieces of copper and is meant to resemble cupped hands with fingers entwined.

You can find almost 500 outdoor sculptures, pieces of environmental art and historical monuments in Helsinki and they are accessible to everyone. See more and search through the database at HAMhelsinki.fi.

Photo Challenge: H2O

Beyond the Flowers

Sculptures of Helsinki

Sculptures of Helsinki #13

Kullervo Addresses His Sword can be found in the grounds of the winter garden since 1967 after being moved from Hesperia park where it first stood. The statue was designed by Swedish born sculptor Carl Eneas Sjöstrand, who was considered the founder of Finnish sculpture as he played a large part in its promotion during the 1850s and 60s. Sjöstrand Made many works relating to the Kalevala, Finland’s national epic, and it’s characters.

You can find almost 500 outdoor sculptures, pieces of environmental art and historical monuments in Helsinki and they are accessible to everyone. See more and search through the database at HAMhelsinki.fi.