The Human Body

I don’t spend nearly enough time in London, it’s a great city with so much to offer. When I do make it there I often get wrapped up in the usual sights to see anything new from the city, but I normally come across one or two new details which impress me.

More often than not these details are the ones that you come across by mistake, you find them when you least expect to, they surprise you, and this is exactly what happened during my recent visit.

But before I tell that story I have to go back a few years to the beginning.

Around five years ago I was flying out to Helsinki from London and had heard about a Damien Hirst exhibition taking place at the Tate Modern, I decided to head down a day early, stay with a friend, and catch my flight after checking out the exhibition.

The Human Body

Damien Hirst at the Tate

Outside the Tate Modern I was greeted by a large sculpture of a human body. The sculpture closely resembled the plastic figures that are used in biology classes,  the ones you can take apart to understand the body’s anatomy, only much larger.

It was my first time at the Tate and my first time seeing Hirst’s work, both equally impressive. I had arrived early and the museum hadn’t yet opened for the day so I spent a bit of time photographing the sculpture and the view over the Millenium Bridge to St Paul’s.

The sculpture itself looked over one of my most favourite views of the city.

The Human Body

Sculpture in the City

This brings me to my more recent visit.

On the way to Leadenhall Market, one of London’s oldest market, to meet a friend I came across another sculpture. At first I thought the sculpture was the same as the one I had seen in London all those years go. It wasn’t until I came home and delved into my archives that I realised they were different.

My searched deepened, I found out the name of the piece, Temple also by Damien Hirst, and that it was part of a public art exhibition called Sculpture in the City.

I guess the point of this story is to say that two unconnected points in time can be linked in a way you may have never expected, chance encounters that take you back in time to past moments. If nothing else it was a good excuse to go through some old photos.

Further Reading:

More from Sculpture in the City 2017 by TimeOut and about the artworks.

Also my last post about the Black Shed Expanded

Explore the Helsinki Metro and the sculptures you can see along the journey, as well as the Sculptures of Helsinki in general.

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Bath Reflections

Bath reflections

It’s opinion time.

I took this photograph during my trip to Bath and have already posted one version of it to my Instagram but as Instagram isn’t really built for multiple images and making comparisons I wanted to get your opinion.

Which one do you prefer?

Go and check out my Instagram to see which version I finally went with.

Bath reflections

 

Best of Bath

Being back in the U.K I had one day to make a trip to a nearby city. As I had been to the neighboring city of Bristol a number of times I thought I would revisit Bath since my last trip they was over ten years ago and I remembered very little of the historical city.

The city of Bath is well know for its Roman Baths and its yellow stone buildings, these can be found almost as soon as you step out of the train station. The city is small and much of it can be enjoyed by walking and that’s what I did. If I had more time I would of liked to walk the six mile walking route that allows views over the city, maybe next time.

My tip for Bath would be once you have seen the Abbey and Roman Baths follow the River Avon until you find The Circus, three rows of terrace houses set out in a circle.

Do you have any suggestions for a trip to Bath?

Best of Bath

Door to the Abbey

Door to the Abbey

Bath, England

Is there still a Thursday door challenge that people are following along with? I remember reading about it a while back but haven’t seen much lately.

Anyway, here is a great door from Bath Abbey.

Even though this is an excellent door situated in the front of the Abbey, visitors enter through a side door to the left, and of course, exit through the gift shop.